Assembly line of Hindustan Aircraft   ASSEMBLY LINE OF HINDUSTAN AIRCRAFT NEAR BANGALORE, MYSORE, TURNS OUT HARLOW TRAINERS.  COMPANY HAS TRAINED 12,000 NATIVE WORKERS, RUNS SCHOOL.
 William D. Pawley
HINDUSTAN'S WILLIAM D. PAWLEY
 American Makes Planes in India     In the industrial desert of India, American enterprise has produced one first-class airplane factory, shown for the first time on this page. It is William Pawley's Hindustan Aircraft, Ltd., and naturally it is in India's most progressive state, Mysore, which has plenty of electric power, steel and semi-skilled labor. This one plant saves the U.S. and Britain millions of tons of shipping space in their effort to supply air power on the continent of Asia. Its very existence is a total surprise to most Americans.     Its founder and president, William Douglas Pawley, is the same mystery man who agitated the famous Flying Tigers into existence. For seven years he owned China's only plane factory and sold China $30,000,000 worth of planes and service. When the Japanese last bombed his plant near the border of Burma, he had already moved the machinery and equipment out to Mysore. He is also president of Intercontinent Aviation Corp. in New York, which sold its Florida plant to Vultee last autumn. The factory in Mysore assembles Vultee and Curtiss-type ships and produces Harlow trainers. In a little less than two years it has equipped itself to repair any type of American plane and has dug out a channel for flying boats. William Pawley's flair for being at the right place a few minutes before the right time has come in handy again for the United Nations.
 American staff American staff is presided over by mustached Briton in white in front row, Sir John Higgins, board chairman, ex-chief of India's Air Force. Left of him is William Pawley.
 Indian staff Indian staff is recruited from the alert young men of progressive Mysore, where education is free. The plant goes in for inter-departmental hockey, dramatics and much team spirit.
 Vultee aircraft Vultee aircraft are being turned out by assembly in the background. The naked fuselages at left evolve into further advanced job at right. Latest Vultee is a serviceable dive bomber with an air-cooled engine, bought by British and U.S. air forces.
 Repair work Repair work is done on all American-type planes in overhaul hangars. In the foreground is a Lockheed Hudson; behind it a B-17D; some Catalinas in left background. These shops are a tremendous asset to the American air effort in India and China.
 Head men Head men are (from left) 23-year-old Maharajah of Mysore, President William Pawley and Board Chairman Sir John Higgins, ex-Air Vice Marshal. In next group come E. P. Pawley and the Prime Minister of Mysore. Plane is a Dutch Catalina.




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 LIFE Magazine - March 22, 1943
LIFE'S COVER:  Lieut. General George C. Kenney at 53 is commander of Allied Air Forces in the Southwest Pacific and commander, Fifth U.S. Air Force. One of the great aerial tacticians of the war, he has been successful in the South Pacific in spite of a relatively small number of planes. Allied Air Forces which won Battle of Bismarck Sea were under his command.




 LIFE Magazine


Adapted by Carl W. Weidenburner
from the March 22, 1943 issue of LIFE.
Portions copyright 1943 Time, Inc.



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